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Wise Parents Don’t Have “Smart” Kids

Posted on November 16, 2007

We have previously devoted several posts to the powerful effect of self-schemas personal narratives and, more specifically, to the remarkable research by Carol Dweck regarding the importance of how people think about intelligence and learning. In February of this year, Po Bronson wrote a terrific article in New York Magazine, in which he provided a […]

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Posted in Education, Life, Social Psychology | 5 Comments »

Being Smart About “Dumb Blonde” Jokes

Posted on November 5, 2007

Jon Hanson recently examined the overlooked effects of sexualized stereotypes in televised advertisements about women, including ads characterized as quasi-public service announcements. We now bring news of a new study by Thomas E. Ford of Western Carolina University which finds that jokes about blonde’s intelligence and women drivers lead to hostile feelings and discrimination against […]

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Posted in Life, Public Policy | 3 Comments »

The Perils of “Being Smart” (or Not So Much)

Posted on March 22, 2007

The the current edition of Stanford Magazine, contains an excellent article (excerpted below) by Marina Krakovsky summarizing Carol Dweck’s research, which is the topic of Dweck’s fascinating recent book, Mind-Set. * * * Through more than three decades of systematic research, she has been figuring out answers to why some people achieve their potential while […]

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Posted in Book, Education, Life, Social Psychology | 16 Comments »

Performing Under Pressure

Posted on September 22, 2010

Situationist friend Sian Beilock’s highly anticipated new book, Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting It Right When You Have To, is now out.  As someone who has had both great successes and great failures under pressure, I’ve been very excited to read Choke since Sian first mentioned it to me.  What […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Book, Life, Neuroscience, Positive Psychology, Situationist Sports | 3 Comments »

Clarence Darrow on the Situation of Crime and Criminals

Posted on February 20, 2010

“Crime and Criminals: Address to the Prisoners in the Chicago Jail” (1902) Preface This address is a stenographic report of a talk made to the prisoners in the Chicago jail. Some of my good friends have insisted that while my theories are true, I should not have given them to the inmates of a jail. […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Deep Capture, Distribution, Education, History, Ideology, Law, Life, Marketing, Morality, Politics, System Legitimacy | 5 Comments »

Consuming Merit, Gatekeeping, and Reproducing Wealth

Posted on August 10, 2009

The op-ed excerpted below, “America’s Best Colleges: Merit by the Numbers,” by Harvard Law School Professor Lani Guinier and Columbia Law Professor Susan Sturm, appeared in the August 5, 2009, edition of Forbes. It eloquently examines the role played and not played by universities in educating young people to promote the system-justifying illusion of merit. […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Distribution, Education, Illusions, Public Policy | 1 Comment »

The Situation of the Achievement Gap

Posted on April 20, 2009

Situationist Contributor Geoffrey Cohen has received a lot of attention in the media over the last week because of fascinating research he and his collaborators are doing and reently desribed in Science regarding one way to help reduce the achievement gap in education. Here are excerpts from one such story, this one, titled “Study: Writing […]

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Posted in Education, Implicit Associations, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 5 Comments »

Being Stephon Marbury: The Situation of Having “Baggage”

Posted on March 4, 2009

Julian Benbow of the Boston Globe has an interesting story on the newest Boston Celtic:  32-year-old Stephon Marbury, a former NBA All-Star point guard who was recently released by the New York Knicks. Marbury is considered a very talented player, but during a 13-year in which he has consistently played for losing teams, he’s developed […]

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Posted in Situationist Sports | Leave a Comment »

Rich Brains, Poor Brains?

Posted on December 3, 2008

From a University of California, Bekeley press release, “EEGs show brain differences between poor and rich kids,” by Robert Sanders. * * * University of California, Berkeley, researchers have shown for the first time that the brains of low-income children function differently from the brains of high-income kids. In a study recently accepted for publication […]

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Posted in Education, Neuroscience | 7 Comments »

Clarence Darrow on the Situation of Crime and Criminals

Posted on October 5, 2008

“Crime and Criminals: Address to the Prisoners in the Chicago Jail” (1902) Preface This address is a stenographic report of a talk made to the prisoners in the Chicago jail. Some of my good friends have insisted that while my theories are true, I should not have given them to the inmates of a jail. […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Deep Capture, History, Law, Life | 2 Comments »

The Situation of Financial Risk-Taking

Posted on September 24, 2008

[This post was first published in February of 2008.] In 1986, Salomon Brothers, an investment bank, was known as “the King of Wall Street.” The Salomon atmosphere has since been hilariously depicted in Michael Lewis‘s now-classic Liar’s Poker, in which he recounts his experiences at the firm. He opens the book with the following anecdote. […]

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Posted in Behavioral Economics, Neuroeconomics, Neuroscience | 1 Comment »

Your Kids Are Not All That

Posted on May 21, 2008

It’s a truism that parents tend to think their children are above-average. Julie Symth of the National Post has an interesting piece on what social psychology can say about this phenomenon. She details a new study by Andrew Wegner and Blaine J. Flowers of the University of Miami in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology […]

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Posted in Life, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

Banaji & Greenwald on Edge – Part III

Posted on March 19, 2008

There is a great video interview of Tony Greewald and Situationist contributor Mahzarin Banaji on Edge. We’re posting parts of the transcript in several bite-sized installments. Part I is here; Part II is here. * * * GREENWALD: The race IAT was critical. It is the version of the IAT that got the widest attention, […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Video | Leave a Comment »

The Situation of Financial Risk-Taking

Posted on February 8, 2008

In 1986, Salomon Brothers, an investment bank, was known as “the King of Wall Street.” The Salomon atmosphere has since been hilariously depicted in Michael Lewis‘s now-classic Liar’s Poker, in which he recounts his experiences at the firm. He opens the book with the following anecdote. It was sometime early in 1986, the first year […]

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Posted in Neuroeconomics, Neuroscience | 2 Comments »

The Situation of Hair Color

Posted on January 22, 2008

This post is a mashup of several newspaper articles, including Shelley Emling’s article, “Blondes, ready for some bad news?,” Tom Spears’s piece, “‘Paris Hilton factor’ sucks IQ points from men and women equally,” and, from Psychology Today, an excerpt from the book Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters, which explores, among other “politically incorrect truths […]

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Posted in Entertainment, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 5 Comments »

The Situation of I.Q.

Posted on January 4, 2008

Malcolm Gladwell has a smart article in this month’s New Yorker, “None of the Above: What I.Q. doesn’t tell you about race.” The lesson, it seems, is that intelligence reflects situational differences, not stable dispositional differences across across racial and ethnic groups or national borders. * * * James Flynn, a social scientist at the […]

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Posted in Education, Life, Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

Susan Fiske — on Teaching Situationism

Posted on December 7, 2007

In 2004, social psychologist Amy Hackney interviewed Situationist contributor Susan Fiske for the journal, Teaching of Psychology. (The full interview is available as a pdf file here.) Below, we have excerpted several of the sections of the interview in which Professor Fiske describes (1) some of the challenges she faces when teaching students stereotyping, prejudice […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

How Situational Self-Schemas Influence Disposition

Posted on August 21, 2007

In May, the American Psychological Society (APS) held their annual conference (drawing 3000 psychologists to D.C.), at which several of social psychology’s biggest hitters — including Situationist contributor Susan Fiske and Situationist friend Dan Gilbert made presentations. The latest issue of Observer, the APS magazine, contains articles summarizing a few of those presentations. Over the […]

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Posted in Events, Life, Social Psychology | 12 Comments »

The Moral Obligation to be Intelligent – Part I

Posted on April 5, 2007

I have authored a preface for a book that is being edited by Eugene Borgida and fellow Situationist contributor Susan Fiske called Beyond Common Sense: Psychological Science in Court. For The Situationist, I am posting a two-part series derived from that preface. * * * John Erskine, founder of Columbia University’s core curriculum in the […]

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Posted in Book, Legal Theory, Social Psychology | 6 Comments »

Race Attributions and Georgetown University Basketball

Posted on March 30, 2007

Earlier this week, we wrote about how group identification and disidentification — “us” and “them” — gives rise to various motivated attributions of causation, responsibility, and blame. Our analysis focused on college basketball fans in the height of March Madness. The motivated attributions we discussed include the ultimate attribution error, which leads fans to attribute […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Situationist Sports, Social Psychology | 8 Comments »