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Animated Gender Stereotypes

Posted on July 31, 2008

[via Sociological Images]

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Posted in Blogroll, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology, Video | 1 Comment »

Gender, Weight, Stereotypes, and Prejudice

Posted on February 25, 2013

From Slate: This month a team of Yale psychologists released a study indicating that male jurors—but not female jurors—were more likely to hand a guilty verdict to obese women than to slender women. The researchers corralled a group of 471 pretend peers of varying body sizes and described to them a case of check fraud. […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Law | 2 Comments »

The Situation of Gender-Science Stereotypes

Posted on July 8, 2009

A BBC podcast of an interview with Situationist Contributor Brian Nosek about Project Implicit’s recent gender-science stereotypes article is available at the BBC World Service’s Science in Action series. * * * To read a sample of related Situationist posts about gender and science, see “The Situation of Gender and Science,” “The Behavioral Consequences of Unconscious Bias,” […]

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Posted in Education, Implicit Associations, Podcasts, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

The Gendered (Lookist) Situation of Venture Capital

Posted on May 4, 2014

From Harvard Business School’s Working Knowledge, here are excerpts of an article by Carmen Nobel about research co-authored by HBS’s Alison Wood Brooks. If you’re in search of startup funding, it pays to be a good-looking guy. A series of three studies reveals that investors prefer pitches from male entrepreneurs over those from female entrepreneurs, […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

The Gendered Situation at Harvard Law School – Part III

Posted on May 15, 2013

The Harvard Crimson‘s Dev Patel has an outstanding series of articles last week on gender inequality at Harvard Law School. Here are some excerpts from the third article, titled “Female HLS Graduates Enter a Job Market Dominated by Men” in the series. The law firm Brune & Richard is an anomaly. In a world where […]

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Posted in Distribution, Education, History, Law | Leave a Comment »

The Gendered Situation at Harvard Law School – Part II

Posted on May 11, 2013

The Harvard Crimson‘s Dev Patel has an outstanding series of articles last week on gender inequality at Harvard Law School. Here are some excerpts from the second article, titled “In HLS Classes, Women Fall Behind” in the series. Among the top students in their graduating classes, men and women entering Harvard Law School earn similar […]

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Posted in Distribution, Education, History, Law | Leave a Comment »

The Gendered Situation at Harvard Law School – Part I

Posted on May 8, 2013

The Harvard Crimson‘s Dev Patel has an outstanding series of articles this week on gender inequality at Harvard Law School. Here are some excerpts from the first article, titled “Once Home to Kagan and Warren, HLS Faculty Still Only 20 Percent Female” in the series. Just 20 percent of U.S. senators are female. Women make […]

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Posted in Distribution, Education, History, Law | Leave a Comment »

The Stereotyped Situation of Dumb Jocks

Posted on May 4, 2013

From Michigan State News: College coaches who emphasize their players’ academic abilities may be the best defense against the effects of “dumb jock” stereotypes, a Michigan State University study suggests. Researchers found that student-athletes were significantly more likely to be confident in the classroom if they believed their coaches expected high academic performance, not just […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Positive Psychology, Situationist Sports, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

The Gendered Situation of Smiling

Posted on February 27, 2013

By Soledad de Lemus, Russell Spears, & Miguel Moya wrote a terrific post on SPSP Blog about the mystery and meaning of the smile.  Here are some excerpts: We  smile when we feel happy, but smiles are more than just the outward display of an inner emotion. We are far more likely to smile when […]

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Posted in Embodied Cognition, Emotions, Evolutionary Psychology, Life | Leave a Comment »

Stereotype Threat for Boys

Posted on February 16, 2013

From Eureka Alert: Negative stereotypes about boys may hinder their achievement, while assuring them that girls and boys are equally academic may help them achieve. From a very young age, children think boys are academically inferior to girls, and they believe adults think so, too. Even at these very young ages, boys’ performance on an […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

The Power of Stereotypes and Need for “Affirmative Meritocracy”

Posted on June 3, 2012

From Stanford University News: When it comes to affirmative action, the argument usually focuses on diversity. Promoting diversity, the Supreme Court ruled in 2003, can justify taking race into account. But some people say this leads to the admission of less qualified candidates over better ones and creates a devil’s choice between diversity and merit. […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Conflict, Distribution, Education, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Sapna Cheryan on Stereotypes as Gatekeepers

Posted on May 29, 2012

TEDxTalks on Apr 27, 2010 Stereotypes as Gatekeepers – Sapna Cheryans research broadly examines how cultural stereotypes impact peoples choices and behaviors. She is particularly interested in the role that stereotypes play in determining peoples sense of belonging to important social groups. In this talk, she asks why do women consider a future in computer […]

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Posted in Ideology, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology, Video | Leave a Comment »

Sian Beilock and Allen McConnell on Stereotype Threat

Posted on September 27, 2011

Related Situationist posts: The Gendered Situation of Math, Humanities, and Romance Not Just Whistling Vivaldi “Women’s Situational Bind,” “The Nerdy, Gendered Situation of Computer Science.” “Social Psychologists Discuss Stereotype Threat,” “The Gendered Situation of Chess,” “The Situation of Gender-Science Stereotypes,” “The Situation of Gender and Science,” “Stereotype Threat and Performance,” “The Gendered Situation of Science & Math,” “Gender-Imbalanced Situation of Math, Science, and Engineering,” “Sex Differences in […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

Implicit Gender Bias in Legal Profession

Posted on September 9, 2011

Justin Levinson and Danielle Young posted their excellent article, “Implicit Gender Bias in the Legal Profession: An Empirical Study” (Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2010) on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract. * * * In order to test the hypothesis that implicit gender bias drives the continued subordination of women […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Law | Leave a Comment »

Sarah Haskins on “Ladyfriend” Stereotypes

Posted on August 21, 2011

From Current: The best part about being a girl is your girlfriends. They keep you happy when you’re sad and make you laugh when you want to cry, and most importantly, tell you what to buy. Related Situationist posts: Barbie Commercials Across the Decades and the Implications on Female Identity and Objectification The Gendered Situation of […]

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Posted in Entertainment, Ideology, Implicit Associations, Life, Marketing, Video | Leave a Comment »

The Gendered Situation of Math, Humanities, and Romance

Posted on June 16, 2011

From the Boston Globe: Psychologists have found that being stereotyped can subconsciously alter behavior. For example, subtle stereotypes of women being weaker in math and science can create a self-fulfilling prophecy, undermining women’s math and science aptitude. According to a new study, though, even supposedly innocent aspects of daily life can have a similar effect. […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Life, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Stereotype Threat

Posted on April 11, 2011

From Wikipedia: A stereotype threat is the experience of anxiety or concern in a situation where a person has the potential to confirm a negative stereotype about their social group. First developed by social psychologist Claude Steele and his colleagues, stereotype threat has been shown to reduce the performance of individuals who belong to negatively stereotyped groups. For […]

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Gender Quotas on Company Boards

Posted on March 22, 2011

When: Wed, March 23, 12:00pm – 1:30pm Where: Langdell South (map) Sponsor: The Harvard Women’s Law Association in cooperation with Prof. Hanson’s Corporations class. Description: Women on Board? A discussion on gender stereotyping in business and the pros & cons of gender quotas on company boards March 23, 12pm-1.20pm Langdell South. Speakers: Prof. Amy Cuddy (Harv […]

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Posted in Distribution, Events, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

The Gendered Situation of Recommendation Letters

Posted on January 3, 2011

From Rice University: A recommendation letter could be the chute in a woman’s career ladder, according to ongoing research at Rice University. The comprehensive study shows that qualities mentioned in recommendation letters for women differ sharply from those for men, and those differences may be costing women jobs and promotions in academia and medicine. Funded […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Distribution, Education, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 6 Comments »

Examining the Gendered Situation of Harvard Business School

Posted on May 5, 2010

Julia Brau, Paayal Desai, Alexandra Germain, Akmaral Omarova, Jung Paik,  and Julie Sandler are all students at Harvard Business School (HBS) who last week published a thoughtful article in their student newspaper The Harbus.  With potential lessons and relevance for many institutions, the piece discusses recent efforts  to understand and address sources of gender discrepancies […]

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Posted in Education, Implicit Associations, Situationist Contributors | Leave a Comment »