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Joshua Buckholtz Comes To Harvard Law – Postponed

Posted on March 29, 2012

Neuroscience, Psychopathology, and Crime Postponed until fall. Wasserstein 1023 Friday, March 30, 2012, 12 – 1pm Why can’t some people stop themselves from doing things that are bad for them? Why can’t some people stop themselves from doing things that hurt others? These questions have puzzled philosophers, economists, and psychologists for centuries. Professor Joshua Buckholtz […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Events, Neuroscience, SALMS | Leave a Comment »

Harvard Law School Mind Science Events This Week

Posted on March 4, 2012

1. “Life at the Top: Evidence on Elite Leaders and Stress Hormone Secretion” Jennifer Lerner, HKS Monday, 3/5, 12 p.m. Wasserstein 1023 Chinese food will be served! Dr. Lerner’s presentation will address her latest research into the relationship between stress and leadership. Leadership is widely believed to be associated with elevated stress. But if leadership […]

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Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

How Deceptive Advertising Preys Upon Our Minds

Posted on March 1, 2012

In my Business Organizations course this semester, we have been spending some time thinking about the collection and use of consumer data by corporations.  We have looked at the types of information that companies gather, how they employ statisticians to “weaponize” this information, and whether (and in what ways) the government might effectively (and constitutionally) […]

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Posted in Deep Capture, Marketing, Neuroscience | 2 Comments »

Paul Bloom at Harvard Law School – Do Babies Crave Justice?

Posted on February 19, 2012

Paul Bloom, Yale psychology professor, will speak at Harvard Law School tomorrow (Monday) in a talk titled “Do Babies Have a Sense of Morality and Justice? Is Kindness Genetic or Learned?” Professor Bloom will argue that even babies possess a rich moral sense. They distinguish between good and bad acts and prefer good characters over […]

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Posted in Altruism, Events, Evolutionary Psychology, Morality | 1 Comment »

The Situation of Social Justice

Posted on February 17, 2012

This book review appeared earlier this week in the American Scientist: THE FAIR SOCIETY: The Science of Human Nature and the Pursuit of Social Justice. Peter Corning. xiv + 237 pp. University of Chicago Press, 2011. $27.50. After decades of exclusion from meaningful social and political discourse, themes of social justice are making a serious […]

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Posted in Altruism, Book, Distribution, Evolutionary Psychology, Ideology, Morality, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Marines Defiling Dead Taliban – Might Recent Neuroscience Shed Light?

Posted on January 11, 2012

From The Daily Princetonian: Failure in the part of the brain that controls social functions could explain why regular people might commit acts of ruthless violence, according to new study by a University research team. A particular network in the brain is normally activated when we meet someone, empathize with him and think about his […]

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Posted in Conflict, Neuroeconomics, Situationist Contributors | Leave a Comment »

God’s Situational Effects

Posted on January 8, 2012

This is the fourth in our series of posts intended to help our readers with their New Year’s resolutions.  From USA Today, here is a brief description of research recently co-authored by Kristin Laurin and Situationist Contributors Aaron Kay and Gráinne Fitzsimons .   God references slipped into tests decreased student’s belief that they controlled their own destiny, […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Life, Morality, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

The Situation of Good Habits

Posted on January 6, 2012

This is the third in our series of posts intended to help our readers with their New Year’s resolutions.  From The Sun Herald, here is a brief description of recent research on the benefits of retraining your brain. What does it really take to change a habit? It may have less to do with willpower […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Environment, Life, Situationist Contributors | 1 Comment »

The Situation of Willpower

Posted on January 4, 2012

With New Year’s resolutions still reasonably fresh in mind, we thought we’d add another post or two on what the mind sciences teach about how better to achieve those elusive goals. The current APA Monitor includes an excellent interview (by Kirsten Weir) of Roy Baumeister, social psychology’s guru on willpower.  We highly recommend his new […]

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Posted in Life, Social Psychology | 4 Comments »

Want To Lose Weight?: Consider the Situational Values of Values

Posted on January 3, 2012

The outstanding Wray Herbert has a terrific piece on The Huffington Post about research done by Situationist Contributor, Geoffrey Cohen. Dieting and weight control are really pretty simple. We gain weight and have trouble losing it because we eat too much and move too little. If we can switch that around, most of us should […]

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Posted in Life, Positive Psychology, Situationist Contributors | 4 Comments »

Can The Law Go Upstream?

Posted on December 22, 2011

Roger Magnusson, Lawrence O. Gostin, and David  Studdert recently posted their paper, “Can Law Improve Prevention and Treatment of Cancer?” on SSRN: The December 2011 issue of Public Health (the Journal of the Royal Society for Public Health) contains a symposium entitled: Legislate, Regulate, Litigate? Legal approaches to the prevention and treatment of cancer. This […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Deep Capture, Environment, Law, Public Policy | Leave a Comment »

Situation, McDonalds, & Tort Law

Posted on December 15, 2011

Professor Caroline Forell has written a wonderfully thoughtful, situationist article, titled “McTorts: The Social and Legal Impact of McDonald’s Role in Tort Suits (forthcoming in Volume 24 of the Loyola Consumer Law Review) on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract. * * * McDonald’s is everywhere. With more than 32,000 restaurants around the world, its Golden Arches […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Food and Drug Law, Law, Legal Theory, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Diane Rosenfeld Speaks Today at HLS

Posted on November 30, 2011

Student Association for Law and Mind Sciences (SALMS) Speakers Series: Diane Rosenfeld: “Penn State, Intervention, and a Theory of Patriarchal Violence” 11/30/201 Join SALMS for the final event of our Fall Speakers Series, when HLS’s Diane Rosenfeld will present on “Penn State, Intervention, and a Theory of Patriarchal Violence” on Wednesday, November 30, 2011, at […]

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Posted in Events, Evolutionary Psychology | Leave a Comment »

Tofurkey or Turkey?

Posted on November 26, 2011

From University of Queensland News: New research by Dr Brock Bastian from UQ’s School of Psychology highlights the psychological processes that people engage in to reduce their discomfort over eating meat. This paper will be published in an upcoming edition of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, where Dr Bastian and his co-authors show that […]

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Posted in Ideology, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

The obedience experiments at 50

Posted on November 9, 2011

This essay was published originally in the online version of the APS Observer: This year is the 50th anniversary of the start of Stanley Milgram’s groundbreaking experiments on obedience to destructive orders — the most famous, controversial and, arguably, most important psychological research of our times. To commemorate this milestone, in this article I present […]

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Posted in Classic Experiments, Situationist Contributors | Leave a Comment »

Responding to Law and Economics: Critiques and Alternatives

Posted on October 17, 2011

The American Constitution Society of Harvard Law School are sponsoring a panel discussion with Situationist Contributor Jon Hanson, Duncan Kennedy, and James Hackney.  Here’s a description: Many law students find that law and economics is a pervasive and seductive way of tying legal issues to the real world. But what are its limits? And what […]

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Posted in Events, Situationist Contributors | Leave a Comment »

The Neuro-Situation of Wins and Losses

Posted on October 10, 2011

From Montreal Gazette: A new National Hockey League season is upon us, Major League Baseball playoffs are in full swing and the National Football League’s regular season has been in session for about a month. As you fixate on your television, watching every move of your favourite athletes and longing for that great play or […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Neuroscience, Situationist Sports | Leave a Comment »

Comparative Psychology: Cephalopods

Posted on September 29, 2011

In a previous post I discussed my struggles with anthropocentrism — and my satisfaction in having it thoroughly shaken by a short video on the otherworldly skin of certain octopuses. After mentioning it to a friend, he pointed me to two other videos of cephalopods engaging in quite shocking (and amazing) behavior — and, it […]

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Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Dr. Steven Hyman at Harvard Law Tomorrow

Posted on September 26, 2011

Student Association for Law and Mind Sciences (SALMS) Speakers Series: Dr. Steven E. Hyman, “Addiction as a Window into Volition” Tuesday, 9/27, 12-1 pm, Pound 101 SALMS serves lunch: Free Burritos! How should the law confront the “choices” of an addict? Though neuroscience research into addiction has advanced dramatically, few lessons have been incorporated into […]

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Posted in Events | Leave a Comment »

The Situation of the Inequality Getting Inequalitier

Posted on September 1, 2011

From PBSNewsHour: Financial gains over the last decade in the United States have been mostly made at the “tippy-top” of the economic food chain as more people fall out of the middle class. The top 20 percent of Americans now holds 84 percent of U.S. wealth, as Paul Solman found out as part of a […]

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Posted in Behavioral Economics, Distribution, Ideology, Video | Leave a Comment »

 
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