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Performing Under Pressure

Posted on September 22, 2010

Situationist friend Sian Beilock’s highly anticipated new book, Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting It Right When You Have To, is now out.  As someone who has had both great successes and great failures under pressure, I’ve been very excited to read Choke since Sian first mentioned it to me.  What […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Book, Life, Neuroscience, Positive Psychology, Situationist Sports | 3 Comments »

Examining the Gendered Situation of Harvard Business School

Posted on May 5, 2010

Julia Brau, Paayal Desai, Alexandra Germain, Akmaral Omarova, Jung Paik,  and Julie Sandler are all students at Harvard Business School (HBS) who last week published a thoughtful article in their student newspaper The Harbus.  With potential lessons and relevance for many institutions, the piece discusses recent efforts  to understand and address sources of gender discrepancies […]

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Posted in Education, Implicit Associations, Situationist Contributors | Leave a Comment »

Not Just Whistling Vivaldi

Posted on May 1, 2010

One of the great social psychologists of our time, Claude Steele, was recently on NPR discussing his new book Whistling Vivaldi and Other Clues to How Stereotypes Affect Us. The book is a moving personal account and a compelling scientific discussion of how stereotypes shape the thoughts, feelings, and actions of those whom they target. […]

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Posted in Book, Classic Experiments, Implicit Associations, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 5 Comments »

The Nerdy, Gendered Situation of Computer Science

Posted on February 1, 2010

From University of Washington News (by Joel Schwarz): * * * In real estate, it’s location, location, location. And when it comes to why girls and women shy away from careers in computer science, a key reason is environment, environment, environment. The stereotype of computer scientists as nerds who stay up all night coding and […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Choice Myth, Education, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

Situationism in the Blogosphere, November 2009 – Part II

Posted on December 3, 2009

Below, we’ve posted titles and a brief quotation from some of our favorite non-Situationist situationist blogging during November 2009 (they are listed in alphabetical order by source). * * * From Nicholas Herrera Psychology Today Blog: “Attributional Biases and Violent Soccer Play” “On November 5, 2009, during a soccer match between the University of New […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Blogroll | Leave a Comment »

Hey Dove! Talk to YOUR parent!

Posted on September 21, 2009

[This post was first published in October of 2007.] Several weeks ago, as part of its much lauded “Dove Campaign for Real Beauty,” Unilever released “Onslaught,” a video (above) examining disturbing images of women in beauty-industry advertising. The video ends with this admonition to parents: “Talk to your daughter before the beauty industry does.” It’s […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Deep Capture, Life, Marketing, Video | 2 Comments »

A Rose by any other Name Might Become a Judge

Posted on August 18, 2009

Bentley Coffey and Patrick McLaughlin have recently published their intriguing article, titled “Do Masculine Names Help Female Lawyers Become Judges? Evidence from South Carolina,” in American Law and Economics Review (Spring 2009). Here are some excerpts from the paper’s introduction (citations omitted). * * * In Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice, a woman named Portia masquerades […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Law, Social Psychology | 3 Comments »

Consuming Merit, Gatekeeping, and Reproducing Wealth

Posted on August 10, 2009

The op-ed excerpted below, “America’s Best Colleges: Merit by the Numbers,” by Harvard Law School Professor Lani Guinier and Columbia Law Professor Susan Sturm, appeared in the August 5, 2009, edition of Forbes. It eloquently examines the role played and not played by universities in educating young people to promote the system-justifying illusion of merit. […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Distribution, Education, Illusions, Public Policy | 1 Comment »

The Situation of the Law School Classroom – Abstract

Posted on July 21, 2009

Robert Chang and Adrienne Davis have posted their interesting article, “Making Up is Hard to Do: Race/Gender/Sexual Orientation in the Law School Classroom” (forthcoming Harvard Journal of Law and Gender (2009)) on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract. * * * This exchange of letters picks up where Professors Adrienne Davis and Robert Chang left off in […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Education, Law | 1 Comment »

The Gendered Situation of Chess

Posted on July 10, 2009

From ChessBase News:  “Normally knowing your enemy is an advantage. Not so in chess games between the sexes. In a study published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, Volume 38, Issue 2 (March/April 2008) (pdf here), Anne Maass, Claudio D’Ettole, Mara Cadinu, Dr Anne Maass (et al.) pitted male and female players against each […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Education, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 5 Comments »

The Situation of Gender-Science Stereotypes

Posted on July 8, 2009

A BBC podcast of an interview with Situationist Contributor Brian Nosek about Project Implicit’s recent gender-science stereotypes article is available at the BBC World Service’s Science in Action series. * * * To read a sample of related Situationist posts about gender and science, see “The Situation of Gender and Science,” “The Behavioral Consequences of Unconscious Bias,” […]

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Posted in Education, Implicit Associations, Podcasts, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

The Situation of Gender and Science

Posted on June 28, 2009

Rachana Dixit wrote a worthwhile article in Daily Progress summarizing recent research illustrating the implicit links between gender and science.  Here are some excerpts. * * * A new study has found that both men and women hold unspoken stereotypes that males are more easily linked with science than females. The work’s authors say the […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

The Situational Effects of a Black President

Posted on June 8, 2009

Last week for Diverse Online, Angela Dodson, wrote an excellent review of conflicting studies regarding the so-called “Obama Effect” — the increase in standardized test scores of Blacks owing to the election of Barack Obama.  Here are some excerpts. * * * Could merely knowing that a Black man has been elected president of the […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Education, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

The Situation of the Achievement Gap

Posted on April 20, 2009

Situationist Contributor Geoffrey Cohen has received a lot of attention in the media over the last week because of fascinating research he and his collaborators are doing and reently desribed in Science regarding one way to help reduce the achievement gap in education. Here are excerpts from one such story, this one, titled “Study: Writing […]

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Posted in Education, Implicit Associations, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 5 Comments »

Stereotype Lift – The Obama Effect

Posted on January 24, 2009

From Sam Dillon’s article, titled “Study Sees an Obama Effect as Lifting Black Test-Takers,” in yesterday’s New York Times. * * * . . . [R]esearchers have documented what they call an Obama effect, showing that a performance gap between African-Americans and whites on a 20-question test administered before Mr. Obama’s nomination all but disappeared […]

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Posted in Education | 6 Comments »

Tierney’s Skepticism at the New York Times

Posted on November 19, 2008

Recently, John Tierney who writes a Science column in the New York Times has shown great skepticism about the concept of implicit bias, how it might be measured (through the Implicit Association Test), and whether it predicts real-world behavior. See, e.g.,  Findings column (Nov. 17, 2008).    I write to make provide praise, critique, and cultural […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Law, Naive Cynicism, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Sexism: The Worst Part Is Not Knowing

Posted on September 12, 2008

From New Scientist (“Chauvinists Less Unnerving than Ambiguous Men“). * * * Chavinistic men can be petty and infuriating, but that might be as far as it goes. Women are more unnerved by not knowing a man’s views than by overt sexism – so much so that they perform worse in exams. Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton at […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

The Implicit Value of Explicit Values

Posted on November 23, 2007

In September of 2006, Karen Rouse wrote a Denver Post article summarizing the fascinating research of social psychologist Geoffrey Cohen. We excerpt portions of her article below. * * * A white male may feel comfortable in the boardroom. But put him on the basketball court with a team of black players, and his own […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 4 Comments »

The Situation of “Winners” and “Losers”

Posted on October 29, 2007

Baseball fans face a bit of a puzzle in making sense of the game’s greatest hitters. We’ll get to the puzzle, but, first, some background for the non-aficionados. Question: who had the most homeruns this season? The answer is Yankee third-baseman Alex Rodriguez, better known as A-Rod. He muscled 54 home runs during the regular […]

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Posted in Situationist Sports, Social Psychology, System Legitimacy | 6 Comments »

Encourage Your Daughters To Play Violent Video Games?

Posted on October 8, 2007

We have examined violence found in videogames on several occasions (see “The Situation of First-Person Shooters“; “The Intersection between Tort Law and Social Psychology in Violent Videogames“). We have also examined how, because of stereotype threat, the situation in which women find themselves can dramatically influence their expectations and levels of confidence (see “Gender-Inbalanced Situation […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Entertainment, Social Psychology | 5 Comments »

 
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