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The Situation of Interrogation and Marketing

Posted on June 6, 2007

An interesting interview of a veteran Air Force interrogator, Steven Kleinman, by Newsweek writer Dan Ephron is available on the Newsweek website. Portions of the interview are excerpted below. But before turning to the interview, our readers should be alerted to several situationist themes that the interview underscores. Most obviously, the interview picks up on […]

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Posted in Politics, Public Policy, System Legitimacy | 1 Comment »

The Situation of Bran-Scan Lie Detectors

Posted on June 15, 2013

Lauren Kirchner of Pacific Standard Magazine has an interesting piece on the science on brain-scan lie detectors and concerns about law enforcement using them. * * * The brain-scan “guilt detection test” is a newer technology that supposedly measures electrical activity in the brain, which would be triggered by specific memories during an interrogation. “When presented […]

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Posted in Law, Neuroscience | Leave a Comment »

The Imagined Ideological Divide

Posted on January 29, 2012

From Eureka Alert (regarding research co-authored by Situationist Contributor Peter Ditto): Republicans and Democrats are less divided in their attitudes than popularly believed, according to new research. It is exactly those perceptions of polarization, however, that help drive political engagement, researchers say. “American polarization is largely exaggerated,” says Leaf Van Boven of the University of […]

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Posted in Ideology, Politics, Social Psychology | 5 Comments »

Online Law and Mind Experiments

Posted on March 8, 2011

The Latest Online Study Clearinghouse Experiments Over the last week, the following experiments have been posted on our new Law and Mind Science Online Study Clearinghouse, a repository for web studies pertaining to law and mind sciences. Judgments of Interrogation Techniques The purpose of this study is to measure the impact of mortality salience on […]

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Posted in Online Experiment | Leave a Comment »

Law, Competition, Self-Interest

Posted on February 15, 2011

Over at the new Law & Mind Blog, several Harvard Law students have been blogging about a chapter by Mitchell Callan and Situationist Contributor Aaron Kay. In the first post on the topic (copied below), 1L student Becky Ding summarizes the chapter (forthcoming in Ideology, Psychology, and Law, edited by Situationist Contributor Jon Hanson). * […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Conflict, Ideology, Law, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

Divided Loyalties Symposium

Posted on February 10, 2011

Situationist Contributor Jon Hanson will give the keynote at an interdisciplinary symposium:“Divided Loyalties: Professional Standards and Military Duty“ Hanson’s talk is titled “Shock Therapy: Changing Unethical Behavior by Understanding its Sources.” The symposium is being held at Case Western University Law School, and is funded in part by the Arthur W. Fiske Memorial Lectureship Fund. […]

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Posted in Conflict, Events, Ideology, Morality, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

Speaking Truth to the Situation

Posted on December 9, 2010

This week’s This American Life was titled “Last Man Standing,” which included three outstanding “stories about people who feel compelled to keep going, especially when everyone else has given up,” including: a story about the only Juror on the trial of former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich who believed he was innocent of trying to sell […]

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Posted in Conflict, Life, Morality | Leave a Comment »

The Norfolk Four and the Situation of False Confessions

Posted on November 11, 2010

From Frontline: Why would four innocent men confess to a brutal crime they didn’t commit? FRONTLINE producer Ofra Bikel (Innocence Lost, An Ordinary Crime) investigates the conviction of four Navy sailors for the rape and murder of a Norfolk, Va., woman in 1997. In interviews with the sailors, Bikel learns of some of the high-pressure […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Deep Capture, Video | Leave a Comment »

The Situation of False Confessions

Posted on October 15, 2010

Deborah Davis and Richard Leo recently posted their paper, “Three Prongs of the Confession Problem: Issues and Proposed Solutions” on SSRN.  (forthcoming in The Future of Evidence (Epstein, Jules, ed.) on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract. * * * Many cases could not be successfully prosecuted without a confession, and, in the absence of a confession, […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Choice Myth, Law | Leave a Comment »

The Situation of False Confessions

Posted on December 29, 2009

Ian Herbert, one of the very best translators of mind science research for popular audiences, has written an informative and disconcerting article, “The Psychology and Power of False Confessions” for the latest issue of The Observer.”  Here are some excerpts. * * * We know that false confessions do happen on a fairly regular basis. […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Illusions, Law | 5 Comments »

Situationism in the Blogosphere – September 2009, Part II

Posted on October 23, 2009

Below, we’ve posted titles and a brief quotation from some of our favorite non-Situationist situationist blogging during September 2009 (they are listed in alphabetical order by source). * * * From Neurophilosoply: “If You Want to Catch a Liar, Make Him Draw” “A man accused of a crime is brought into a police interrogation room […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Blogroll | 1 Comment »

Robert Cialdini Explains Social Psychology

Posted on August 14, 2009

From the excellent Big Think, here’s a worthwhile video of social psychologist Robert Cialdini talking about some of the social psychologists who influenced his work, including Situationist contributor Phil Zimbardo. * * * * * * For a sample of other Situationist posts discussing Robert Cialdini’s research, see “The Situationist Overwhelmed with Visitors, Return Later […]

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Posted in Classic Experiments, Marketing, Social Psychology, Video | 2 Comments »

Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld, and Tenet: “Guilty”

Posted on May 8, 2009

More than 10,000 people cast their votes during the last year and a half in a virtual voting booth at www.LuciferEffect.com. Their judgments accord with the recent Senate Armed Services bipartisan report that blames Bush officials for detainee abuse. It also finds that the prison guards and interrogators were not the “true culprits.” The vast majority […]

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Posted in History, Ideology, Law, Politics, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

The Justice Department, Milgram, & Torture

Posted on April 30, 2009

From Situationist friend Michael Cross, we received the following message regarding Tuesday night’s John Stewart interview of Cliff May on The Daily Show (below). * * * * * * In the beginning of the interview, May says that he doesn’t believe anyone in the current or previous administration was “pro-torture.”  He then explains that […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Classic Experiments, Video | 2 Comments »

Situationist Abstracts from the Globe

Posted on February 26, 2009

Kevin Lewis, at the Boston Globe, routinely assembles intriguing collections of abstracts for his outstanding “Uncommon Knowledge” series.  Here is a sample from recent installments. * * * From January 11, 2009: It’s true, your dog relaxes you THE DOG MAY indeed be one of man’s best friends. New research suggests that people get the […]

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Posted in Abstracts | Leave a Comment »

Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld, and Tenet: “Guilty”

Posted on December 19, 2008

More than 10,000 people cast their votes during the last year and a half in a virtual voting booth at www.LuciferEffect.com. Their judgments accord with the recent Senate Armed Services bipartisan report that blames Bush officials for detainee abuse. It also finds that the prison guards and interrogators were not the “true culprits.” The vast majority […]

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Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

Why Torture? Because It Feels Good (at least to “Us”)

Posted on November 16, 2008

Kevin Carlsmith is an assistant professor of psychology at Colgate University doing great work of significant interest to our readers.  Today, he published fascinating commentary,  “Torture’s Attraction Is Not Information — It’s Retribution,” in Nieman Watchdog.  Here are some excerpts. * * * How did the United States go from a champion of human rights […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Conflict, Emotions, Law, Morality, Social Psychology | 4 Comments »

Without the Filter

Posted on October 21, 2008

Governor Sarah Palin wants “to talk to Americans without the filter” of the “media elite.”  As she explained in the vice-presidential debate, she aims to cut out the middleman in conveying information to the public: “I may not answer the questions that either the moderator or you [Senator Joe Biden] want to hear, but I’m […]

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Posted in Choice Myth, Deep Capture, Politics | Leave a Comment »

The Situationist Overwhelmed with Visitors, Return Later if Necessary

Posted on September 15, 2008

Noah J. Goldstein, Steve J. Martin, and Robert B. Cialdini have a new book, titled “Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive.”  As you might have guessed, it makes a compelling case for itself.  Here’s an excerpt. * * * How can inconveniencing your audience increase your persuasiveness? Colleen Szot is one of the […]

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Posted in Behavioral Economics, Book, Choice Myth, Classic Experiments, Marketing, Social Psychology | 2 Comments »

Should Psychologists Assist Military Interogations?

Posted on August 19, 2008

Benedict Carey of the New York Times has an interesting piece on a debate within the psychology profession over whether psychologists should provide assistance on military interrogations. We excerpt the article below. * * * They have closely studied suspects, looking for mental quirks. They have suggested lines of questioning. They have helped decide when […]

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Posted in Conflict, Public Policy, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

 
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