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Jennifer Eberhardt Wins MacArthur!

Posted on September 17, 2014

Congratulations to Situationist friend, Jennifer Eberhardt who is one of this year’s MacArthur Grant winners. Eberhardt investigates the subtle, complex, largely unconscious yet deeply ingrained ways that individuals racially code and categorize people and the far-reaching consequences of stereotypic associations between race and crime. To read numerous Situationist posts about Eberhardt’s research or presentations at […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Law, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Jennifer Eberhardt’s “Policing Racial Bias” – Video

Posted on February 4, 2009

At the 2007 Project on Law and Mind Sciences Conference, Jennifer Eberhardt’s presentation was titled “Policing Racial Bias.” Here is the abstract for her talk. Despite our desire to be egalitarian, racial bias fundamentally alters how we see.  In the first part of her talk, Dr. Eberhardt will focus on the implicit processing of a […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Law, Social Psychology, Video | 4 Comments »

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Situationism

Posted on January 18, 2014

This post was originally published on January 22, 2007. * * * Monday’s holiday provides an apt occasion to highlight the fact that, at least by my reckoning, Martin Luther King, Jr. was, among other things, a situationist. To be sure, King is most revered in some circles for quotations that are easily construed as […]

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Posted in History, Ideology, System Legitimacy | Leave a Comment »

Nalini Ambady, Stanford psychology professor, dies at 54

Posted on November 2, 2013

By Bjorn Carey (Stanford News) Nalini Ambady, a Stanford professor of psychology, died Oct. 28 after a long battle with leukemia. Her passing followed a yearlong, worldwide effort by family, friends and students to find a bone marrow donor match. She was 54. A distinguished social psychologist, Ambady was well known for her research showing […]

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Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Situationism

Posted on January 21, 2013

This post was originally published on January 22, 2007. * * * Monday’s holiday provides an apt occasion to highlight the fact that, at least by my reckoning, Martin Luther King, Jr. was, among other things, a situationist. To be sure, King is most revered in some circles for quotations that are easily construed as […]

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Posted in History, Ideology, System Legitimacy | Leave a Comment »

The Implicit Situation of Criminal Justice

Posted on October 5, 2012

Robert Smith, Charles Ogletree, and Johanna Wald hare recently posted a synopsis of their chapter, titled “Coloring Punishment: Implicit Social Cognition and Criminal Justice” (in Justin D. Levinson and Robert J. Smith (eds), Implicit Racial Bias Across the Law, 2012) on SSRN.  Here’s the synopsis: The United States has become the world’s leader in incarceration. […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Law | 2 Comments »

Nancy Gertner on The Situation of Dispositionist Criminal Sentencing

Posted on September 8, 2012

From Cognoscenti: There is a canned, formulaic newspaper story about any criminal case. It can be repeated in every prosecution, no matter what the crime, no matter who the defendant. Here’s how it goes: Judge X sentenced defendant Y to five years (or whatever the number). The prosecutor argued for 10 (or higher than the […]

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Posted in Law, Video | Leave a Comment »

Racial Bias Among Criminal Defense Lawyers

Posted on August 31, 2012

Andrea Lyon recently posted her article, “Race Bias and the Importance of Consciousness for Criminal Defense Attorneys” (Seattle University Law Review, Vol. 35, p. 755, 2012) on SSRN. Here is the abstract. The problems of racial bias pervade the criminal justice system. In this paper a subject that is not much talked about — the […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Law | 1 Comment »

Race and Dehumanization

Posted on June 15, 2012

I was very sorry to miss the Implicit Racial Bias Across the Law Book Launch Conference yesterday.  It’s rare for such a great set of law and mind sciences speakers to assemble in one spot and the topic continues to be of great importance for all those committed to ironing out injustice in our legal […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Ideology, Implicit Associations | Leave a Comment »

Implicit Bias in the Courtroom

Posted on March 30, 2012

Situationist Contributor Jerry Kang and his numerous co-authors, Mark Bennett, Devon Carbado, Pamela Casey, Nilanjana Dasgupta, David Faigman, Rachel Godsil, Anthony Greenwald, Justin Levinson, and Jennifer Mnookin, have just posted their important paper, “Implicit Bias in the Courtroom” (forthcoming UCLA Law Review, Vol. 59, No. 5, 2012) on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract: Given the substantial […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Law, Legal Theory, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

Justice for Trayvon

Posted on March 26, 2012

For The Situationist, Sabreena El-Amin (Harvard Law School student and President of the Student Association for Law and Mind Sciences (SALMS)), has authored the following legal analysis of the Trayvon Martin shooting and situationist analysis of the “stand your ground” doctrine.  We are pleased to publish it and look forward to more contributions from Sabreena […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Law, SALMS, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Race, Guns, and the Danger of Private Law Enforcement

Posted on March 21, 2012

It is heartbreaking to read the details that are emerging concerning the killing of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida. Various theories have been advanced to explain how Trayvon, an unarmed African-American teenager, was shot in the chest by a neighborhood watch captain in a gated community.  Some have focused on the potential bad disposition of […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Situationism

Posted on January 15, 2012

This post was originally published on January 22, 2007. * * * Monday’s holiday provides an apt occasion to highlight the fact that, at least by my reckoning, Martin Luther King, Jr. was, among other things, a situationist. To be sure, King is most revered in some circles for quotations that are easily construed as […]

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Posted in History, Ideology, System Legitimacy | 2 Comments »

The Interior Situation of Atrocities

Posted on January 10, 2012

From People’s World (an article summarizing recent research by Situationist Contributor Susan Fiske): Why do people commit atrocities? What is responsible for brutality and the cold blooded murder of innocents carried out by Nazis, the Hutu in Rwanda, or the United States against the Vietnamese people and more recently much of the civilian population of […]

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Posted in Altruism, Conflict, Ideology, Implicit Associations, Neuroscience, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

The Dehumanized Situation of Atrocities

Posted on December 17, 2011

From Duke Today, a story about recent research by Situationist Contributor Susan Fiske: A father in Louisiana bludgeoned and beheaded his disabled 7-year-old son last August because he no longer wanted to care for the boy. For most people, such a heinous act is unconscionable. But it may be that a person can become callous […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Conflict, Evolutionary Psychology, Morality, Neuroeconomics, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 3 Comments »

Race Effects on Ebay

Posted on October 24, 2011

Ian Ayres, Situationist Contributor Mahzarin Banaji, and Christine Jolls recently posted their paper, titled “Race Effects on Ebay” on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract. * * * We investigate the impact of seller race in a field experiment involving baseball card auctions on eBay. Photographs showed the cards held by either a dark-skinned/African-American hand or a […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Marketing, Online Experiment | Leave a Comment »

Poverty and Delinquency

Posted on October 15, 2011

Tamar Birckhead recently posted her article, “Delinquent by Reason of Poverty” (forthcoming Journal of Law and Policy, Vol. 38, 2012) on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract. * * * This Article, written for the 12th Annual Access to Equal Justice Colloquium, explores the disproportionate representation of low-income children in the United States juvenile justice system. It […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Law | Leave a Comment »

Do Doctors Lack Empathy?

Posted on August 29, 2011

Shortly after I finished Simon Baron-Cohen’s new book, The Science of Evil: On Empathy and the Origins of Cruelty, I spoke to one of my friends who had just had an extremely bad interaction with a doctor.  The friend had just received a frightening diagnosis and when she went to ask more questions, the doctor […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Altruism, Book, Emotions | 4 Comments »

The Cause of Rioting? That’s Easy: Rioters!

Posted on August 16, 2011

British Prime Minister David Cameron attributed the recent riots in his to “the slow-motion moral collapse that has taken place in parts of our country these past few generations.”   The message may seem vaguely situationist at first blush, as Cameron emphasizes the problem of a “broken society.” But what he really seems to care about […]

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Posted in Conflict, Distribution, Law, Politics, Public Policy, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

The Situation of Criminal Blaming

Posted on May 20, 2011

Janice Nadler and  Mary-Hunter McDonnell recently posted their paper, “Moral Character, Motive, and the Psychology of Blame” (forthcoming Cornell Law Review) on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract. Blameworthiness, in the criminal law context, is conceived as the carefully calculated end product of discrete judgments about a transgressor’s intentionality, causal proximity to harm, and the harm’s foreseeability. […]

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Posted in Law, Legal Theory, Morality | Leave a Comment »

 
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