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Stereotype Threat for Boys

Posted on February 16, 2013

From Eureka Alert: Negative stereotypes about boys may hinder their achievement, while assuring them that girls and boys are equally academic may help them achieve. From a very young age, children think boys are academically inferior to girls, and they believe adults think so, too. Even at these very young ages, boys’ performance on an […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Sian Beilock and Allen McConnell on Stereotype Threat

Posted on September 27, 2011

Related Situationist posts: The Gendered Situation of Math, Humanities, and Romance Not Just Whistling Vivaldi “Women’s Situational Bind,” “The Nerdy, Gendered Situation of Computer Science.” “Social Psychologists Discuss Stereotype Threat,” “The Gendered Situation of Chess,” “The Situation of Gender-Science Stereotypes,” “The Situation of Gender and Science,” “Stereotype Threat and Performance,” “The Gendered Situation of Science & Math,” “Gender-Imbalanced Situation of Math, Science, and Engineering,” “Sex Differences in […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

Stereotype Threat

Posted on April 11, 2011

From Wikipedia: A stereotype threat is the experience of anxiety or concern in a situation where a person has the potential to confirm a negative stereotype about their social group. First developed by social psychologist Claude Steele and his colleagues, stereotype threat has been shown to reduce the performance of individuals who belong to negatively stereotyped groups. For […]

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Posted in Education, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology, Video | Leave a Comment »

The Situation of Stereotype Threat

Posted on February 19, 2010

Randy Khalil has a nice article, “‘Stereotype threat’ negatively affects students,” in Wednesday’s Daily Princetonian.  Here are some excerpts. * * * Princeton students fall victim to the “stereotype threat,” according to a study led by Adam Alter GS ’09. The “stereotype threat” is the phenomenon in which reminding people of negative stereotypes associated with […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Education, Situationist Contributors, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Social Psychologists Discuss Stereotype Threat

Posted on October 5, 2009

Amber Tunnell has an article in the Columbia Spectator describing a recent talk given by social psychologist (and Columbia Provost) Claude Steele about his pathbreaking work on stereotype threat.  Here are some excerpts. * * * Two problems launched Steele’s career, he said: the underperformance of women and minority students on cognitive tests in academic […]

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Posted in Education, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology, Video | 1 Comment »

Stereotype Threat and Exit Exams

Posted on May 2, 2009

Last month Mitchell Landsberg had an interesting article, titled “High school exit exam hinders female and non-white students, study says,” in the Los Angeles Times.  Here are some excerpts. * * * California’s high school exit exam is keeping disproportionate numbers of girls and non-whites from graduating, even when they are just as capable as […]

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Posted in Education | 2 Comments »

Stereotype Threat and Performance

Posted on December 20, 2007

David Dobbs of Scientific American links to a piece by S. Alexander Haslam, Jessica Salvatore, and Thomas Kessler of the University of Exeter entitled “How Stereotypes Shape Performance.” They discuss new research on stereotype threat, a topic that we have examined on multiple occasions and refers the (often self-fulfilling) fear that one’s behavior or performance […]

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Posted in Education, Situationist Sports, Social Psychology | 3 Comments »

The Gendered Situation at Harvard Law School – Part II

Posted on May 11, 2013

The Harvard Crimson‘s Dev Patel has an outstanding series of articles last week on gender inequality at Harvard Law School. Here are some excerpts from the second article, titled “In HLS Classes, Women Fall Behind” in the series. Among the top students in their graduating classes, men and women entering Harvard Law School earn similar […]

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Posted in Distribution, Education, History, Law | Leave a Comment »

The Stereotyped Situation of Dumb Jocks

Posted on May 4, 2013

From Michigan State News: College coaches who emphasize their players’ academic abilities may be the best defense against the effects of “dumb jock” stereotypes, a Michigan State University study suggests. Researchers found that student-athletes were significantly more likely to be confident in the classroom if they believed their coaches expected high academic performance, not just […]

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Posted in Implicit Associations, Positive Psychology, Situationist Sports, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

The Situation of the 53 Percent

Posted on October 8, 2012

Situationist Contributor Eric Knowles recently published this excellent piece on Huffington Post: What has crystallized in the last few weeks of the 2012 presidential campaign is nothing less than a battle between two competing theories of success — about where success comes from and the role of government in fostering it. However, this question, which […]

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Posted in Education, Situationist Contributors | 2 Comments »

The Situation of Privilege

Posted on September 24, 2012

From NortonSOC: Shamus Khan (Columbia University) discusses his C. Wright Mills award-winning book, Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul’s School, and how elite schools “convert birthright into credentials” for privileged students. Here is a summary of the book: As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Paul’s […]

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Posted in Distribution, Education, Video | Leave a Comment »

The Power of Stereotypes and Need for “Affirmative Meritocracy”

Posted on June 3, 2012

From Stanford University News: When it comes to affirmative action, the argument usually focuses on diversity. Promoting diversity, the Supreme Court ruled in 2003, can justify taking race into account. But some people say this leads to the admission of less qualified candidates over better ones and creates a devil’s choice between diversity and merit. […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Conflict, Distribution, Education, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

The Situation of Ability

Posted on March 8, 2012

From Scott Barry Kaufman‘s Huffington Post post (1/9/12): A bulk of research shows that when people are put in situations where they are expected to fail, their performance does plummet. They turn into different people. Their head literally shuts down, and they end up confirming the expectations. When they’re expected to win, their performance shoots […]

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Posted in Education, Emotions, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Judicial Mindsets

Posted on September 18, 2011

Victor D. Quintanilla recently posted his situationist paper, “Judicial Mindsets: The Social Psychology of Implicit Theories and the Law” (forthcoming Nebraska Law Review) on  SSRN.  Here’s the abstract: This article introduces Dr. Carol Dweck’s seminal and significant line of psychological research on the phenomenon of implicit theories and draws on this research as a lens […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Law, Legal Theory, Social Psychology | Leave a Comment »

Implicit Gender Bias in Legal Profession

Posted on September 9, 2011

Justin Levinson and Danielle Young posted their excellent article, “Implicit Gender Bias in the Legal Profession: An Empirical Study” (Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2010) on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract. * * * In order to test the hypothesis that implicit gender bias drives the continued subordination of women […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Law | Leave a Comment »

The Gendered Situation of Math, Humanities, and Romance

Posted on June 16, 2011

From the Boston Globe: Psychologists have found that being stereotyped can subconsciously alter behavior. For example, subtle stereotypes of women being weaker in math and science can create a self-fulfilling prophecy, undermining women’s math and science aptitude. According to a new study, though, even supposedly innocent aspects of daily life can have a similar effect. […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Life, Social Psychology | 1 Comment »

Claude Steele Returns to Stanford

Posted on June 14, 2011

From Stanford News: Claude Steele, provost of Columbia University and a preeminent scholar of social psychology, will be the next dean of Stanford University’s School of Education, President John Hennessy and Provost John Etchemendy announced today. Steele was a member of the Stanford faculty from 1991 to 2009, when he assumed the position as chief […]

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Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Belonging

Posted on March 18, 2011

From Eureka Alert: Along with the excitement and anticipation that come with heading off to college, freshmen often find questions of belonging lurking in the background: Am I going to make friends? Are people going to respect me? Will I fit in? Those concerns are trickier for black students and others who are often stereotyped […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Distribution, Education, Implicit Associations, Situationist Contributors | 2 Comments »

Negotiating the Situation

Posted on February 9, 2011

Lu-in Wang,  has posted an intriguing situationist paper, titled “Negotiating the Situation: The Reasonable Person in Context ” (forthcoming Lewis & Clark Law Review, Vol. 14, p. 1285, 2010) on SSRN.  Here’s the abstract. * * * This Essay argues that our understanding of the reasonable person in economic transactions should take into account an […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Implicit Associations, Life, Social Psychology | 2 Comments »

The Gendered Situation of Recommendation Letters

Posted on January 3, 2011

From Rice University: A recommendation letter could be the chute in a woman’s career ladder, according to ongoing research at Rice University. The comprehensive study shows that qualities mentioned in recommendation letters for women differ sharply from those for men, and those differences may be costing women jobs and promotions in academia and medicine. Funded […]

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Posted in Abstracts, Distribution, Education, Implicit Associations, Social Psychology | 6 Comments »

 
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