The Situationist

The Situation of Ethical Consumption

Posted by The Situationist Staff on August 16, 2007

fair-trade.jpg

An interesting set of studies recently looked into the role of situation in influencing “ethical” consumption.

Loosely, those studies indicate that strategies focusing on dispositionist solutions (for instance, information campaigns that presume individual consumers will alter their consumption patterns in the given situation) tend to be unsuccessful, but well-executed strategies that alter the situation (for instance, the infrastructure and available options in the consumption space) are relatively successful. The press release summarizing the study is pasted below and is available here.

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The most effective campaigns to encourage ethical consumption are those that take place at a collective level, such as the creation of Fairtrade cities, rather than those that target individual behaviour. These are the findings of a new study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). The research suggests that ethical consumption is best understood as a political phenomenon rather than simply a market response to consumer demand.

fair-trade-in-rwanda.jpg“For many people, their choice to buy ethical goods or services is shaped by both personal and public commitments” says Dr Clive Barnett of the ESRC’s Cultures of Consumption programme. People bring a wide range of ethical concerns to their everyday consumption practices, from the personal responsibilities of family life to more public commitments like membership of a faith community or political affiliation.

The research team found that campaigns aimed at getting people to change what they buy often worked on the assumption that individuals lack the necessary information to make educated decisions about the consequences of what they buy and where they buy it from. However the findings from the study suggest that people don’t necessarily lack the information about Fairtrade, organic food, environmental sustainability, or third world sweatshops. They do, however, often lack effective pathways to acting on their concerns over these issues.

By holding a series of 12 focus-groups in different areas of Bristol, the team were able to access a wide range of participants differentiated by class, gender, ethnicity, race, age, income and education. The results from the focus-groups found that individual’s ability to adopt ethical consumption practices are affected by different levels of material resources in terms of their income and access to shops that sell ethically sourced goods.

Dr Barnett said: “People actually seem very aware of these types of things, but often don’t feel that they have the opportunities or resources to be able to buy Fairtrade products or ethically sourced goods. And it’s not as simple as the consumer making a choice to buy an item that is ethically sound.”

A great deal of the consumption people do they don’t do as ‘consumers’ exercising ‘choice.’ Lots of consumption is embedded in relationships of obligation where people are acting as parents, caring partners, football fans or good friends. Some consumption is used to sustain these sorts of relationships: giving gifts, buying school lunches, getting hold of this season’s new strip. And quite a lot of consumption is done as the background to these activities, embedded in all sorts of infrastructures (eg transport, energy, water) over which people have little or no direct influence as individual ‘consumers’.

In order to successfully encourage people to adopt ethical consumption activities, it is important to call on their specific identities, as for example a member of the local community or faith group, rather than just targeting them as ‘faceless’ and ‘placeless’ consumers. The most successful initiatives are those that find ways of making changes to the practical routines ofnewcastle-fair-trade-partnership.jpg consumption. For example, by changing how and what people buy and from where through establishing initiatives such as Fairtrade networks or achieving the status of a Fairtrade town or city.

In order to become a Fairtrade town, the local council must pass a resolution supporting Fairtrade, a range of Fairtrade products must be readily available in the area’s shops and served in local cafés and catering establishments and Fairtrade products must be used by a number of local workplaces and community organisations. Fairtrade town and Fairtrade city initiatives are a means of raising awareness around issues of global inequality and trade justice, as well as transforming collective infrastructures of provisioning so that everyone, irrespective of their ‘choice’, becomes an ‘ethical consumer.’

The research findings present a clear message says Dr Barnett: “If ethical consumption campaigns are to succeed they need to transform the infrastructures of every day consumption rather than focusing on changing individual consumer behaviour.”

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Thanks to a terrific post by Corey Tomsons at Thought Capital for making us aware of those studies.

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2 Responses to “The Situation of Ethical Consumption”

  1. Erik said

    There is some question whether Fairtrade is actually as ethical as advertised. Here is an excerpt from The Economist, Dec. 7, 2006, “Good Food?”:

    Fairtrade food is designed to raise poor farmers’ incomes. It is sold at a higher price than ordinary food, with a subsidy passed back to the farmer. But prices of agricultural commodities are low because of overproduction. By propping up the price, the Fairtrade system encourages farmers to produce more of these commodities rather than diversifying into other crops and so depresses prices—thus achieving, for most farmers, exactly the opposite of what the initiative is intended to do. And since only a small fraction of the mark-up on Fairtrade foods actually goes to the farmer—most goes to the retailer—the system gives rich consumers an inflated impression of their largesse and makes alleviating poverty seem too easy.

  2. […] 4) The Situationist: The Situation of Ethical Consumption. […]

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