The Situationist

Some (Interior) Situational Sources of War – Part VII

Posted by The Situationist Staff on June 20, 2007

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This series is devoted to highlighting some of the psychological tendencies that encourage individuals and groups to enter conflicts and wars that they later regret. Part I and Part II of the series included portions of an article co-authored by Daniel Kahneman and Jonathan Renshon, titled “Why Hawks Win.” Part III reproduced an op-ed written by Situationist friend Dan Gilbert on July 24, 2006. Part IV and Part V in this series contained the two halves of an essay written by Situationist Contributor, Jon Hanson within the week following 9/11. Part VI contains an op-ed written by Situationist Contributor John Jost on October 1, 2001, “Legitimate Responses to Illegitimate Acts,” which gives special emphasis to the role of system justification.

In this installment, we post a video created and narrated by psychologist Roy J. Eidelson, Executive Director of the Solomon Asch Center at the University of Pennsylvania. The video is entitled “Resisting the Drums of War.” In it, Eidelson focuses on five core human concerns — vulnerability, injustice, distrust, superiority, and helplessness — that “profoundly influence our personal and collective lives.” The video contains an impressive collection of speech and interview excerpts, which it employs to show how the current administration manipulated (and is manipulating) those concerns to justify initiating, maintaining, and expanding the war. Eidelson’s video also offers suggestions on how to counter appeals to the five core concerns.

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5 Responses to “Some (Interior) Situational Sources of War – Part VII”

  1. […] Some ( Interior ) Situational Causes of War […]

  2. […] Some (Interior) Situational Sources of War – Part VII […]

  3. […] to Illegitimate Acts,” which gives special emphasis to the role of system justification. Part VII includes a video entitled “Resisting the Drums of War.” The film was created and narrated by […]

  4. […] To read this article in its entirety, click here. To follow up on themes addressed in the article, specifically those examined in the last section regarding the young man turning to war, look at the series, “Some (Interior) Situational Sources War.” To read the most recent post in that series, which contains link to all the previous posts of the series, click here. […]

  5. […] Some (Interior) Situational Sources War – Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV, Part V, Part VI, Part VII […]

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